Black punk rockers create their own lane in hip-hop dominated Atlanta 

 Conkrete GOD singer Denitra Isler takes a selfie before performing at a Punk Black event at Union EAV on Dec. 14, 2017. BRANDEN CAMP / SPECIAL TO THE ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION 

Conkrete GOD singer Denitra Isler takes a selfie before performing at a Punk Black event at Union EAV on Dec. 14, 2017. BRANDEN CAMP / SPECIAL TO THE ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION 

 

Buu’Ti Haus looks and acts the part of a punk rocker.

Wearing a loosely tied kimono, complete with heeled platform sneakers and a purple sequined flower in her hair, she stands on stage at Atlanta’s Union EAV bar and tosses a fistful of glitter into the faces of the delirious crowd of about 60 people.

The audience is a potpourri of black people. Some are dressed in button-up shirts and loafers. Others in ripped jeans, colored hair, ear gauges and piercings. One girl stands in front of the stage swaying and flashing icy blue eyes winged with black eyeliner.

Buu’Ti Haus, whose real name is Denitra Isler, turns her back on the crowd to face her band, Conkrete GOD.

The drummer — large and shirtless with star-shaped tattoos across his chest — provides the tempo, followed by the bass and guitars, while Buu’Ti Haus winds her hips to the beat.

Buu’Ti Haus turns back to face the crowd.

“Are you ready?”

The music picks up and at 11:34 p.m. on a wintry Thursday night, there’s a mosh pit raging in the middle of Atlanta.

In the hip-hop dominated landscape of Atlanta, meet the underdogs of the city’s music scene.

Bands like Conkrete GOD and collectives like Punk Black are fighting to gain traction in a genre of music that isn’t usually associated with black people — punk rock. The genre itself is on the fringes these days, but these groups are looking for a foothold.

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